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diogenes_of_sinope:dio_chrysostom_oration_72_excerpts

Diogenes of Sinope | Dio Chrysostom, Oration 72, excerpts

Dio Chrysostom, Oration 72.10-11

However, not all have this motive in coming up and making themselves a nuisance; on the contrary, there are persons who indulge in this kind of curiosity and, in a way, are not bad persons either. These approach any whom, because of their dress, they take to be philosophers, expecting to hear from them some bit of wisdom which they could not hear from any one else, because they have heard regarding Socrates that he was not only wise but also accustomed to speak words of wisdom to those who approached him, and also regarding Diogenes, that he too was well provided with statement and answer on each and every topic. And the masses still remember the sayings of Diogenes, some of which he may have spoken himself, though some too were composed by others.

Source: Discourses by Dio Chrysostom published in the Loeb Classical Library, 1932. The text is in the public domain.

Dio Chrysostom, Oration 72.13

And there are those who think that Aesop too was somewhat like the Seven Sages, that while he was wise and sensible, yet he was crafty too and clever at composing tales such as they themselves would most enjoy to hear. And possibly they are not wholly mistaken in their suppositions and in reality Aesop did in this way try to admonish mankind and show them wherein they were in error, believing that they would be most tolerant toward him if they were amused by his humour and his tales — just as children, when their nurses tell them stories, not only pay attention to them but are amused as well. As the result, then, of this belief, that they are going to hear from us too some such saying as Aesop used to utter, or Socrates, or Diogenes, they draw near and annoy and cannot leave in peace whomever they may see in this costume, any more than the birds can when they see an owl.

Source: Discourses by Dio Chrysostom published in the Loeb Classical Library, 1932. The text is in the public domain.

Dio Chrysostom, Oration 72.16

Just so, though each of us has the garb of Socrates and Diogenes, in intellect we are far from being like those famous men, or from living as they did, or from uttering such noble thoughts. Therefore, for no other reason than because of our personal appearance, we, like the owls, collect a great company of those who in truth are birds, being fools ourselves besides being annoyed by others of like folly.

Source: Discourses by Dio Chrysostom published in the Loeb Classical Library, 1932. The text is in the public domain.

diogenes_of_sinope/dio_chrysostom_oration_72_excerpts.txt · Last modified: 2014/01/14 23:19 (external edit)