Images

Scene shows Diogenes leaning on a tablet and Antisthenes holding a club in his right hand.

Giulio_Bonasone_-_Diogenes_and_Antisthenes_detail

Description
English: Detail of plate 35, from Achillis Bocchii Bonon, Symbolicarum quaestionum de Universo genere quas serio ludebat. Print made by Giulio Bonasone. Scene shows Diogenes leaning on a tablet and Antisthenes holding a club in his right hand. Inscription reads “caede sivis nihil tam durum quome summove as dum aliquid dixeris” which seems to translate as “strike if you want, nothing is so tough to drive me away, as long as you have something to say”.
Date
Source Bibliothèque nationale de France
Author Giulio Bonasone

A Seal Impression of King Hezekiah

A seal impression of King Hezekiah
A seal impression of King Hezekiah unearthed in the Ophel excavations at the foot of the southern wall of the Temple Mount, conducted by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Institute of Archaeology under the direction of Dr. Eilat Mazar.
Credit: Photo courtesy of Dr. Eilat Mazar; Photographed by Ouria Tadmo

Image found on http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/12/151202132519.htm

 

Empedocles Disappears

Empedocles Volcano

 

The tricky point was to convince people that this had actually occurred, after he died.   Being Empedocles, he came up with a brilliant scheme.  One night, in his old age, he crept away from his friends — so that they’d think he’d mysteriously disappeared — and threw himself into the nearby volcano, Mt Etna.

This crafty plan went horribly wrong a few days later when the volcano had a minor eruption.  One of the bronze sandals was disgorged.  His friends found it on the slope and had no trouble guessing where Empedocles had gone.  I confess I’m somewhat reminded of the grand schemes of Wile E. Coyote.

<http://www.garycorby.com/2012/08/the-strange-end-of-empedocles.html?m=1.>

The Temple of Olympian Zeus in Athens

The Temple of Olympian Zeus in Athens, also known as the Olympieion, was built over several centuries starting in 174 BCE and only finally completed by Roman emperor Hadrian in 131 CE. Its unusually tall columns and ambitious layout made the temple one of the largest ever built in the ancient world.

Zeus Temple

Submitted by , published on 18 August 2015 under the following license: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike